Jean Charest and the desire to win …

By Bernard Bujold – LeStudio1.com
I fairly well known Jean Charest in 1984 with Brian Mulroney and later in 2003 when my colleague of horse riding in Bromont, Pierre Paradis, often spoke of plans to overthrow Jean Charest… 
-In 1984, Jean Charest (26 years) was the Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois of the Mulroney government with which I was a press officer. Charest and I were the same age (we are even born a few days near the same month …) but he was a member and it was said that he was the future of the Conservative Party when Mulroney was tp retire. Charest had the patter and the energy of a young star like a hockey player. Unfortunately, Charest lost the leadership to Kim Campbell fand it was the death of the Conservative Party in Ottawa in 1993. 
-In 2003, I remember many lunches at the stable in Bromont with Pierre Paradis when the latter told me that his Quebec Liberal Party waited for the day after the election to get rid of Jean Charest, who had lost the 1998 election and seemed to lose it during 2003. Complete surprise, Jean Charest won the 2003 election and it is Pierre Paradis, who took the door… In 2003, Charest had put water in his wine against his ennemies in his own party and he cuddled up to the day after his election victory when he only then started to impose his status as a winner and the leader. Politics is a game of chance, of winning moves and errors. But above all we must never underestimate the opponents! 
-In 2012, Jean Charest has made mistakes, and as he is losing his hockey playoff series. The key to success, in hockey as in politics, is to never take the victory for granted and to always play with passion and energy of the beginner. Jean Charest lost his passion and his fire to win! He believed that his talent was enough to give him the victory. The article by Denis Lessard perfectly summarizes the current situation in Quebec.
Photo 1: Brian Mulroney and Mila (photo Bernard Bujold 1984) and Jean Charest;
Photo 2: Bernard Bujold on Parliament Hill in Ottawa (1984);
SEE text Denis Lessard ;

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